Iraq 1995


According to EXTRAREFERENCE, Iraq is an Arab country located in the Middle East, bordered by Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, Turkey and Iran. It has a population of over 40 million people and its official language is Arabic.

The culture of Iraq is incredibly diverse and rich in history; with many religions, languages and customs present throughout the country. Iraqi culture has been greatly influenced by its long history; with Islam being one of the oldest religions still practiced today. Music plays an important role in Iraqi culture; with traditional styles such as Maqam still popular today. There are also several festivals throughout the year celebrating various aspects of life such as Nowruz or Eid ul-Fitr.

The economy in Iraq is largely based on oil & gas exports, agriculture and services; with exports including dates, carpets and cotton contributing significantly to GDP growth. Major export partners include China, India and Turkey; while its main import partners include China, South Korea and Germany.

According to aceinland, nicknamed ‘the land between two rivers’ due to its position between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers; Iraq offers visitors an array of activities ranging from sightseeing to exploring ancient monuments or simply relaxing on one of its many stunning beaches or villages dotted along coastline or inland areas. With its varied cultural heritage combined with vibrant cities offering plenty of entertainment options for all ages; Iraq truly offers something for everyone!

Iraq Bordering Countries

Population of Iraq

In 1995, Iraq’s population was estimated to be around 18 million people. This number was slightly higher than the population of Iraq in 1990, which was estimated to be around 16 million. The majority of the population was made up of Arabs, who constituted around 80% of the total population. Kurds were the second largest ethnic group in Iraq at that time, making up 15-20% of the total population. Other ethnic minorities included Turkmens, Assyrians and Armenians.

According to allcitypopulation.com, the majority of Iraqis lived in rural areas with smaller numbers living in urban centers such as Baghdad and Mosul. The urban population accounted for about 20-25% of the total population at that time. The majority of Iraqis were Sunni Muslims, but there were also significant numbers of Shia Muslims and small numbers of Christians, Yazidis and other religious minorities living throughout the country.

The Iraqi economy had suffered greatly due to a decade long war with Iran followed by years of economic sanctions imposed by the United Nations following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990. This had caused high levels of poverty and unemployment throughout Iraq with many families struggling to make ends meet. Despite this, there were still some pockets of wealth among certain sections of society such as government officials and businessmen who had benefited from their close ties with Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Economy of Iraq

In 1995, Iraq’s economy was still reeling from the effects of a decade-long war with Iran followed by years of economic sanctions imposed by the United Nations following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990. This had caused widespread poverty and unemployment throughout Iraq, with many families struggling to make ends meet.

The Iraqi economy was heavily reliant on oil exports and the government relied heavily on revenue from oil exports to fund its operations. However, due to the economic sanctions, oil exports were severely restricted and this had a significant impact on government revenue as well as the country’s overall economic performance.

In addition to oil exports, other industries in Iraq included agriculture, fishing and manufacturing. Agriculture was an important source of employment for many Iraqis and accounted for around 12% of GDP in 1995. Fishing was also an important industry with Iraq having access to some of the world’s richest fishing grounds in the Persian Gulf. Manufacturing accounted for around 8% of GDP at that time and included industries such as textiles, leather goods, food processing and pharmaceuticals.

Despite these industries, Iraq continued to suffer from high levels of poverty and unemployment due to economic mismanagement under Saddam Hussein’s regime as well as international sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council following his invasion of Kuwait in 1990. Inflation rates were also very high at that time making it difficult for ordinary Iraqis to make ends meet.

The Iraqi currency had also been weakened significantly due to international sanctions which made it difficult for ordinary Iraqis to access foreign currency or purchase imported goods. This further compounded their financial struggles during this period making life even more difficult for many people living in Iraq at that time.

Foreign Policy of Iraq

In 1995, Iraq’s foreign policy was largely determined by Saddam Hussein’s regime and its goal of restoring Iraqi sovereignty. Under Saddam Hussein, Iraq sought to strengthen ties with other Arab countries and was keen to improve its relationship with the United States.

In terms of regional relations, Iraq sought to maintain good ties with its neighbours in the Middle East. Iraq had good relations with Syria, Kuwait and Jordan and maintained diplomatic relations with other countries in the region such as Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Iraq also sought to normalize its relationship with the United States which had been strained since Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990. In 1995, Iraq began to implement UN Security Council resolutions which were designed to restore Iraqi sovereignty following the Gulf War. This included allowing UN weapons inspectors into Iraq and taking steps towards disarmament which were seen as a positive step forward in improving US-Iraqi relations.

In addition, Iraq also sought to strengthen its ties with other countries around the world including Russia, China and North Korea. Saddam Hussein was keen to develop economic ties with these countries as well as military cooperation in order to gain access to advanced weapons technology which could be used by his regime.

Overall, in 1995 Iraq was attempting to restore diplomatic relationships with the international community after years of sanctions imposed by the UN following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990. By seeking improved diplomatic ties with other countries around the world and making progress on disarmament issues, Iraq hoped that it could begin rebuilding its economy while also re-establishing itself as a key player on the international stage.

Events Held in Iraq

In 1995, Iraq saw a number of significant events take place. In January 1995, the UN Security Council passed Resolution 986 which allowed Iraq to export oil under the Oil-for-Food Program in exchange for food and medicine. This resolution was seen as a major breakthrough for Iraq and marked the beginning of an economic recovery following years of sanctions imposed by the international community.

In March 1995, Saddam Hussein’s son Uday Hussein organised a controversial motor race in Baghdad which was attended by over 100,000 people. The event was seen as a demonstration of Saddam Hussein’s power and was aimed at boosting morale following the Gulf War.

Later that same year, in November 1995, Iraq held its first elections since 1987. The election saw Saddam Hussein’s Ba’ath Party remain in power with the president being reelected with 99% of the vote. Despite criticisms that the election was not free or fair due to widespread voter intimidation and fraud, it marked an important step forward for democracy in Iraq.

In December 1995, after months of negotiations and progress on disarmament issues, UN weapons inspectors were allowed into Iraq for the first time since 1991. This marked another important milestone in improving US-Iraqi relations and restoring Iraqi sovereignty following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990.

Overall, 1995 saw a number of significant events take place in Iraq which marked a turning point for the country after years of conflict and struggle under Saddam Hussein’s regime. The passing of Resolution 986 allowed Iraq to start rebuilding its economy while also making progress on disarmament issues which improved US-Iraqi relations and restored Iraqi sovereignty following years of international sanctions.

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